Follow us on Twitter

Access to Information

You are here

The survey included a series of questions on access to information and media, and the perception of various sources of information. It sought to explore the extent to which long-term prospects for displaced people to resettle, return and to escape poverty are hindered by the lack of access to basic information about what is going on their province or wider environment.

Figure 15: Respondents’ main source of information

Figure 15 -  Respondents’ main source of information

Nearly half the respondents (46%) identified the television as their main source of information, while 23 percent mentioned friends and family, and 22 percent mentioned the radio. Other sources of information were mentioned by 9 percent of the respondents. Over half the households indicated owning a television (55%) and/or a radio (55%), falling to 20 percent and 42 percent respectively in Maguindanao.

The nature and level of access to information were highly unequally distributed between strata and settlement groups. Radio and televisions were the main source of information for 60 percentor more of the households in Lanao del Norte (62%), Sultan Kudarat (79%), North Cotabato (81%), and Cotabato City (90%). In Lanao del Sur and Maguindanao, informal sources of information such as family and friends were more frequently the main source of information (53% and 44% respectively), while the radio and television played less of a role (35% and 44% respectively). Only 43 percent and 57% of people in those provinces said they sometimes listened to the radio. This may partly explain why respondents there ranked their level of information about events in their province and in Mindanao more negatively than those in other provinces:

Overall, one third of the respondents reported being not at all or little informed about events in their province (36%) and in Mindanao (33%). In Maguindanao and Lanao del Sur, respectively 64 percent and 49 percent said they had no or little information about events in their province, compared to the average of 35 percent. Similarly, respectively 58 percent and 49 percent said they had no or little information about events in Mindanao compared to an average of 33 percent.

Figure 16: Respondents’ main source of information

Figure 16 -  Respondents’ main source of information

The results further suggest that households that were displaced at the time of the survey were most likely to rely on informal sources of information (i.e., friends and family – 53%) and to report that they were not at all or little informed about events in their province (68%) and in Mindanao (63%).

The findings on media consumption further underline the tendency of currently displaced households to rely on informal sources of information. While 70 percent of total respondents reported watching television at least occasionally, only 49 percent of those still displaced did so This compares to 60 percent of those returned home, and over 70 percent among those never displaced (77%) and those resettled elsewhere (72%). Similarly, two out of three respondents listened to the radio at least occasionally (65%), but the proportion was lowest among displaced households (52%) and those returned home (57%), compared to those resettled elsewhere (64%) and those never displaced (71%). Among the formal media, newspapers were the least consumed (21% of the respondents), especially among displaced households (9%) and those who were formerly displaced andreturned back home (11%).

Despite the relatively high scores on media consumption in percentage terms, respondents held mixed views as to how much they trusted the media. Television was cited as the most trusted source (41% said they trusted information on TV a lot or extremely), followed by the radio (25%) and newspapers (15%). Respondents in Maguindanao were the least trusting with 18 percent trusting information on television a lot or moderately and even lower proportion trusting the radio (8%) and newspapers (10%). This is reflected in the low level of trust in the media among displaced households (television: 21%, radio: 9%, newspaper: 10%).